Just One Shot

Just One Shot: Deep Roots by Martin Siggers

Water is one of my favourite things to work with when photographing scenery. There are so many ways you can use it to enhance an image or to pop a particular scene. Sometimes though the old tricks are the best and this shot is a nice bit of classic reflection work. As an aside, this was the first time I'd picked up the D600 in a few weeks and I was reminded how lovely it is to work with. This pairing offers super wide angle views with excellent quality in a very portable package.

Just One Shot: Mighty Frame by Martin Siggers

Natural History Museum, London Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 17mm f/2.8@f/5.6, 1/60, ISO800

Natural History Museum, London
Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 17mm f/2.8@f/5.6, 1/60, ISO800

This gigantic skeleton is of a Blue Whale, aka the largest animal to have ever existed. The Natural History Museum have it suspended from the roof of one of their animal display halls, reinforced by the giant metal brackets you see in the picture.

This was tricky to compose because there are a vast number of extraneous elements that had to be framed out of the shot. As a result it fails to quite communicate the massive scale I had been going for, but I still think it's dramatic enough to warrant a place here. As ever with indoor shoooting of large objects, it's tricky to balance the need for depth of field with the desire to open the lens up as wide as possible. Micro 4/3's greater natural DoF helps in this regard, but I still think if I had the chance again I might have stopped down a litttle more.

Just One Shot: Stegosaurus by Martin Siggers

Natural History Museum, London
Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 45mm f/1.8@f/5.6, 1/50, ISO1250.

Museums can be wonderful places to take unique images, but they can be tricky as well. There's a huge proliferation of people and other exhibits to act as distracting elements, lighting can be tricky, and it's too easy to fall into 'tourist' mode and just snap away without thought for composition or presentation. That said, sometimes the stars do align and you get to take advantage of the dramatic lighting and rare subject matter. The E-M5 proves itself in low-light again with punchy contrast capturing the underlit skeleton well.