olympus

Just One Shot: Mighty Frame by Martin Siggers

Natural History Museum, London Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 17mm f/2.8@f/5.6, 1/60, ISO800

Natural History Museum, London
Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 17mm f/2.8@f/5.6, 1/60, ISO800

This gigantic skeleton is of a Blue Whale, aka the largest animal to have ever existed. The Natural History Museum have it suspended from the roof of one of their animal display halls, reinforced by the giant metal brackets you see in the picture.

This was tricky to compose because there are a vast number of extraneous elements that had to be framed out of the shot. As a result it fails to quite communicate the massive scale I had been going for, but I still think it's dramatic enough to warrant a place here. As ever with indoor shoooting of large objects, it's tricky to balance the need for depth of field with the desire to open the lens up as wide as possible. Micro 4/3's greater natural DoF helps in this regard, but I still think if I had the chance again I might have stopped down a litttle more.

Just One Shot: Stegosaurus by Martin Siggers

Natural History Museum, London
Olympus OM-D E-M5, Olympus 45mm f/1.8@f/5.6, 1/50, ISO1250.

Museums can be wonderful places to take unique images, but they can be tricky as well. There's a huge proliferation of people and other exhibits to act as distracting elements, lighting can be tricky, and it's too easy to fall into 'tourist' mode and just snap away without thought for composition or presentation. That said, sometimes the stars do align and you get to take advantage of the dramatic lighting and rare subject matter. The E-M5 proves itself in low-light again with punchy contrast capturing the underlit skeleton well.

Shooting with the Olympus OM-D E-M5 by Martin Siggers

Anybody who knows me knows it's no secret that I love SLRs. To me even the latest generation of electronic viewfinders hasn't gotten close to the accuracy and precision of optical, and the bigger sensors and more robust bodies of SLRs have always seemed like insurmountable advantages to me. However, mirrorless is definitely the wave of the future and the advantages are difficult to deny - smaller size and lighter weight are vital for those out and about with their cameras every day. I've maintained a small mirrorless system  since the early days of the format, relying on  Olympus's 2010 E-PL1 as my walkabout camera. The format has undergone huge shifts since those early days though and the result is the E-PL1 is now something of a dinosaur. Enter the  E-M5.

Read More